Nearly 200 pieces of illicitly trafficked cultural relics returned to Costa Rica in Venezuela

release:2018-01-22 16:13:01 publisher:ARTS coin_Global art digital asset trading platform-artschain.com

图片版权归原作者所有

The photo shows a photo taken at the National Museum of San Jos é in San Jos é, capital of Costa Rica, on January 17th 2018. Shows the precious artifacts of the pre-Columbus period recovered. Photo: Agence France-Presse / Ezekiel Besela.


图片版权归原作者所有

The photo shows a photo taken at the National Museum of San Jos é in San Jos é, capital of Costa Rica, on January 17th 2018. Shows the precious artifacts of the pre-Columbus period recovered. Photo: Agence France-Presse / Ezekiel Besela.

Costa Rican authorities said on Wednesday 17th that nearly 200 pieces of precious cultural relics have been recovered from Venezuela, which have been collected by wealthy Estonian art collectors. This makes the country's historical record more complete.

On the same day, 196 stone and ceramic statues were handed over to the National Museum of Costa Rica. This marks the success of the largest project for the return of cultural relics in Central American countries.

The delicate statues handed over varied in shape. Including portraits of soldiers and animals and balls and grindstones handmade by indigenous peoples in different parts of Costa Rica. In Italy, famous navigator Christopher Columbus. Christopher Columbus arrived on 1502. These aborigines have lived here for thousands of years.

At a news conference, Ma Lin Carbo Calvo, head of the National Museum's heritage protection department, said. The valuable cultural relics recovered this time were brought abroad by illegal elements through "illegal trafficking" channels. And eventually became a collection of Estonian businessman Harry Mannill.

Manier lived most of his life in Venezuela and died in Costa Rica on 2010. Manier opened his home in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, as a private museum showcasing his lifelong collection of pre-Columbian and Native American art treasures.

Between 2009 and 2014, Venezuelan authorities searched for a number of precious artifacts. Manier tried to transfer some of them to the United States, but was stopped by Venezuelan customs inspectors.

On December 24th last year, all returned antiquities were shipped out by Venezuelan government officials and arrived in Costa Rica on January 2nd, before being formally handed over to the National Museum of Costa Rica.

The President of Costa Rica, Luis Guillermo Solis, said at a news conference: "Today. Costa Rica's historical record has become more complete. With nearly 200 precious pieces of historical relics back, the pieces of our lost legacy, Hua Zhang, have finally been filled. "

Solis added that the artifacts "are an important part of our history, but have been illegally trafficked abroad by lawbreakers and subjected to many humiliations"... at the same time. He asked the National Museum to hold a public display of all recovered collections in a special pavilion.

Source: China Cultural relics Network



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